The Science is Never Settled

In recent years–and even more so in the last 11 months–I have been hearing a lot of the “S” word lately.  And no, not the expletive that would actually very appropriately describe the last 11 months, but rather, references to science. We have all heard the phrases “Follow the science.”  “The science is clear.” “TheContinue reading “The Science is Never Settled”

White Coats and Cardigans

I recently read the book, “Breaking and Mending” by Dr. Joanna Cannon, a memoir of a doctor’s training experience in the UK.  In it, she writes, “In our first lecture on day one of medical school, as we were welcomed into our medical career, we were told something else—that there are two kinds of doctors,Continue reading “White Coats and Cardigans”

Continuity of Care: Now More Than Ever

I’ve been conducting virtual clinic visits for almost a full year now.  At first, mostly telephone, then gradually transitioning to video encounters; it was helpful to be able to “lay eyes” on my patient.  Actually, I have been pleasantly surprised by how much we can accomplish during a virtual visit. And not just reviewing bloodContinue reading “Continuity of Care: Now More Than Ever”

The Wisdom of Homer

In an effort to pass the time during these pandemic months, I’ve been binge watching many shows, including of course several Netflix series but also some old favorites such as Seinfeld and the Simpsons. Recently, I watched an episode of the Simpsons (S30/E5) entitled: Baby You Can’t Drive My Car. In this episode, a self-drivingContinue reading “The Wisdom of Homer”

Bridge Over Troubled Water

Needless to say, the pandemic has fundamentally changed numerous aspects of our lives, including the ability to connect with friends, family, and loved ones.  It’s even more challenging as cold weather sets in, impeding the ability to gather outdoors. Over the summer, hosting small gatherings on the patio felt very safe and a welcome breakContinue reading “Bridge Over Troubled Water”

Out of the Mouths of Babes, Again

After my cancer diagnosis, and I might say after the initial shock wore off, I was impressed by how my children–ages 8 and 11 at the time–asked such great questions and often had mature and thoughtful insights into the situation. Their resilience, together with their questions and comments reminded me of that old saying, “OutContinue reading “Out of the Mouths of Babes, Again”